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4 comments

  • daemon

    daemon 3 years, 5 months ago

    That was a bit much, but then everything can be twisted when you're feeling that flexible. This would make a great article in the Onion, but I think the author may be taking himself seriously.

    Worth the read, if only to see a truly unusual viewpoint. I just think he tried a bit too hard. Straining to find the covert at the exclusion of the overt.

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    • ahnyerkeester

      ahnyerkeester 3 years, 5 months ago

      I tend to agree. Godawa is a film writer himself but sometimes he seems a bit angry in his reviews.

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      • daemon

        daemon 3 years, 5 months ago

        The interesting thing is, I believe we all tend to view art, movies, books, music, the whole spectrum of human expression, through the lens of our own philosophy, belief system, world view, whatever you might want to call it.

        Once we have decided on the story we see, we find it where ever we look, or at least interpret that story onto everything we encounter. He certainly does this with this review, and in great detail.

        It can be very interesting to see through someone else's lens at the same subject matter and get a different take on it, even when we may not agree with it.

        True art, in my opinion, shatters those lenses we use and makes us confront the spectacle naked and anew. Those moments can be breathtaking.

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        • ahnyerkeester

          ahnyerkeester 3 years, 5 months ago

          Absolutely. Good art can be interpreted a number of ways. That includes poetry, painting, sculpture, theater, film, etc. A great example is Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter". It could be taken as anti-Puritan or early feminism or a morality play on the virtue of confessed sin versus hidden sin, and so on. Moby Dick has been interpreted as fallen man (Ahab) versus God (Moby Dick) where Ahab hates him but cannot let him go. Or it can be viewed as a warning against obsession. Or an environmentalist apologetic.

          So I don't begrudge Godawa his interpretation but I think you called it right, he seems angry about it.

          Having said all of that, I believe that the best way to "use" art is to analyze it, form an opinion of the message and then discuss it with others. The interplay should hone various interpretations even if it never reconciles them. I love to do that but honestly, I have no intention of seeing this film. Maybe when it hits Netflix.

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